• Abiotic

    Non-living chemical and physical components of an environment which affect the biotic (living) components. Examples include wind, light, water and soil. Also see Biotic.More »
  • Biotic

    The living components of an environment which affect other living components of that environment. Predators, prey and decomposers are all biotic influences on each other. Also see Abiotic.More »
  • CSIRO

    The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is an Australian Federal Government research organisation established in 1916. The very body that invented WiFi no less! Australian scientists tend to pronounce the abbreviation as…More »
  • Inorganic

    Does not contains carbon. (Exceptions to this definition are the simpler carbon-containing compounds such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and the carbonates (those containing the CO32- carbonate ion). See The Scientific Meaning of ‘Organic’.More »
  • Organic

    Contains carbon. (Excludes simpler carbon-containing compounds such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and the carbonates (those containing the CO32- carbonate ion). See The Scientific Meaning of ‘Organic’.More »
  • Pedogenesis

    ‘Pedogenesis’ is a combination of the Ancient Greek words πέδον, pedon, ’soil’, and γένεσις, génesis, ‘origin, birth’ — ’soil birth’. Pedogenesis is the process of soil formation from weathering (physical), chemical,…More »
  • SIC (Soil Inorganic Carbon)

    Carbon in soil from sources which were never alive. Cf. SOC (Soil Organic Carbon). Also see Carbon in Soil.More »
  • SOC (Soil Organic Carbon)

    Carbon in soil in living and from once-living organisms. Cf. SIC (Soil Inorganic Carbon). Also see Carbon in Soil.More »
  • Soil Inorganic Carbon (SIC)

    Carbon in soil from sources which were never alive. Cf. Soil Organic Carbon (SOC). Also see Carbon in Soil.More »
  • Soil Organic Carbon (SOC)

    Carbon in soil in living and from once-living organisms. Cf. Soil Inorganic Carbon (SIC). Also see Carbon in Soil.More »
  • Soil Profile

    A soil profile consists of the individual layers, or soil horizons, that soil is made of. It is revealed by a vertical cross-section of undisturbed soil in its natural state.More »

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